Open feedback

Lessons from a year of open feedback

Michael Carden Employee experience, Feedback Leave a Comment

Employee feedback is traditionally collected through anonymous surveys. A year ago we started working with a group of forward-thinking enterprises to trial open feedback. This is what we have learned. Micro-actions make macro impacts I met Arjun at one of our user sessions. He’d greeted me with a half smile before taking his seat at the back of the room, not quite looking me in the eye. After some coaxing, he explained that he was one of a huge team of developers at the insurance company. Of course. The beautiful space I was in had the feel of a hot …

We need to talk about your anonymous feedback

Hi Kelly. We need to talk about your anonymous feedback.

Michael Carden Employee experience, Feedback Leave a Comment

If you can figure out whose feedback you’re reading from what it says, how it’s said, or by applying basic data filters, then guess what? Your feedback isn’t anonymous. Cautionary tale 1: anonymous feedback is the enemy of specificity Ken’s had a rough month dealing with issues in the very specialised reports that he owns. So he has a choice to make at feedback time. Does he: a) give open and honest feedback on the reporting problems in the hopes that this feedback leads to changes in the process and less frustration in future, or b) not say anything about …

Response rate matters

Why response rate matters more than score

Michael Carden Engagement Leave a Comment

Pop quiz! What’s going to be more useful to you in the long run: a high engagement survey score with a low response rate, or a low engagement score with a high response rate? High engagement is good, right? Low is bad? You want to know if you have a highly engaged workforce, so you need as many survey responses as you can get. Ideally 100%. Definitely more than the 10-15% you can expect from surveying complete strangers. Response rate matters. Surveys are an average of opinions… of those who bother responding When do you leave a hotel review online? …

The anonymity paradox

The Anonymity Paradox

Michael Carden Employee experience, Engagement, Feedback 1 Comment

Communication is a spectrum. On the left is face to face. On the right is a YouTube comment section. In the middle are all manner of different ways of connecting. Bluetooth phone calls while driving. Group WhatsApp with those folk you met at a festival. Teleconferences where one dude is at an airport and only ever remembers to press mute before he starts talking. Each of these different ways of communicating has its own rules of acceptable behavior. There’s probably things you’d say in an email that you’d not say face to face. I’ve certainly found myself on written rants …